<img src="//tracker.clixtell.com/track/t.gif">
Skip to the main content.
Call Us Now
Call Us Now

HIB Vaccine

Compensation may be available if you're facing health complications after receiving the HIB vaccine.

Our law firm specializes in vaccine injury cases, supporting your HIB vaccine-related claims. To start
the process with our expert team, please fill out our intake forms below.

 

Work With Us At No Cost

Talk With A Lawyer Now

Injured by a vaccine?

Over 80% of vaccine injuries are from flu shots.

Our lawyers have represented over 4,000 clients across the United States.

Speak With Us Today

What is the HIB Vaccine?

The Haemophilus influenzae type b (HIB) vaccine is a crucial immunization designed
to protect against diseases caused by the HIB bacteria

This vaccine is particularly vital for young children, as they are most susceptible to severe infections like HIB meningitis and bacterial meningitis. Haemophilus influenzae type b is a type of bacteria that can reside in the human respiratory tract without causing illness. However, it becomes a concern when it moves beyond the respiratory tract into other body parts.
This bacteria is one of several types of Haemophilus influenzae, but it is particularly noted for causing serious invasive diseases. If the HIB bacteria invades parts of the body where bacteria are not usually present, like the bloodstream, lungs, brain, and spinal cord linings, it can cause severe infections. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the introduction of the HIB vaccine has led to a dramatic decline in the cases of invasive HIB disease, from about 20,000 cases annually in the early 1980s to just a few hundred cases each year in the US today.

History of the HIB Vaccine

The development of the HIB vaccine marks a significant milestone in medical history. 

Initially introduced in the 1980s, this vaccine was developed to combat Haemophilus influenzae type b, a leading cause of severe pediatric infections. Over the years, the vaccine has evolved, with the current HIB conjugate vaccines offering enhanced safety and effectiveness. These advances have drastically reduced the incidence of invasive HIB disease in children, transforming the landscape of pediatric healthcare.

Medical Uses of the HIB Vaccine

The HIB vaccine is primarily used to protect against various serious conditions caused by the Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria. Here's a list of the key diseases and conditions it helps prevent:

  • HIB Meningitis: An infection of the brain and spinal cord membranes, often leading to serious complications like brain damage.
  • Bacterial Meningitis: Although similar to HIB meningitis, this broader category includes infections caused by other bacteria.
  • Pneumonia: The vaccine helps prevent pneumonia caused specifically by HIB bacteria.
  • Epiglottitis: A severe throat infection that can obstruct the airway, making breathing difficult.
  • Septic Arthritis: An infection in the joints that can lead to long-term damage.
  • Cellulitis: A skin infection that can become severe if caused by HIB bacteria.

     

All Case Evaluations Are Free

HIB Vaccine

How the HIB Vaccine Works

The HIB vaccine stimulates the body's immune system to recognize and combat the Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria. Here's an explanation of its mechanism:

  1. Introduction of Antigens: The vaccine contains small, harmless parts of the HIB bacteria, known as antigens. These do not cause the disease but are enough to trigger the immune response.
  2. Immune Response Activation: When these antigens enter the body, the immune system identifies them as foreign invaders. This recognition prompts the immune system to produce antibodies specifically tailored to fight off the HIB bacteria.
  3. Memory Cell Formation: The immune system develops memory cells and creates antibodies. These cells remember the specific makeup of the HIB bacteria.
  4. Long-term Immunity: If the vaccinated individual later encounters the actual HIB bacteria, these memory cells quickly recognize and respond to the bacteria. The immune system rapidly produces antibodies to fight the infection, often preventing the disease from developing or significantly reducing its severity.

By educating the immune system in this way, the HIB vaccination provides long-term protection against severe HIB infections without exposing the vaccinated individual to the actual risks of the disease.

What are the Types of HIB Vaccine

There are several formulations of the HIB vaccine, each designed to provide effective protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b:

  • HbOC (HibTITER): This is a conjugate vaccine where the HIB antigen is chemically linked to a protein carrier. It's known for its strong immune response, especially in younger children.
  • PRP-T (ActHIB, Hiberix, Omnitrope): The HIB antigen is conjugated to a tetanus toxoid protein in this type. This formulation is highly effective and commonly used worldwide.
  • PRP-OMP (PedvaxHIB, COMVAX): The HIB antigen here is conjugated with a protein from the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis. This vaccine often leads to a quicker immune response after the first dose, making it a preferred choice in some early childhood immunization schedules.
  • PRP-D (ProHIBiT): The HIB antigen is conjugated with diphtheria toxoid in this older formulation. However, it's less commonly used now due to its lower effectiveness in infants than other types.

Each of these formulations has been tailored for optimal immune response in different age groups and vaccination schedules, guaranteeing broad and effective protection against HIB bacteria.

However, despite these vaccines' overwhelmingly positive effects, there remains a rare case when adverse reactions happen. That is when you need the help of an experienced vaccine injury law team.

Talk With A Lawyer Now

Vaccine Data: Statistics and Key Figures

The HIB vaccine has played a significant role in public health, drastically reducing the incidence of HIB diseases. However, like all medical interventions, it's important to be aware of its usage, effectiveness, and the potential for adverse reactions. Here are some key statistics:

  • Dramatic Reduction in Disease Incidence: The CDC reports that since introducing the HIB vaccine, cases of invasive HIB disease in children under five have decreased by 99% in the United States.
  • High Vaccination Rates: According to the World Health Organization (WHO), global coverage with three doses of the HIB vaccine has reached approximately 72%, highlighting its widespread acceptance and use.
  • Adverse Reactions and VAERS Reports: While most HIB vaccine recipients experience no or mild side effects, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) provides a mechanism for reporting significant adverse effects. It's essential to note that the number of severe reactions reported is relatively low compared to the millions of doses administered.
  • Compensation for Vaccine Injuries: The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) covers HIB vaccines. As per VICP data, a small percentage of individuals have received compensation for injuries related to the HIB vaccine, acknowledging the rare but real risk of serious adverse reactions.

Vaccine Effectiveness and Duration of Protection

The effectiveness and duration of protection offered by the HIB vaccine are significant factors in its global success. Studies indicate that the vaccine is highly effective, with a success rate of over 95% in preventing HIB infections.

Children gain long-term protection once the full series of vaccinations is completed, typically by the age of 15 months. The immunity provided by the HIB vaccine is believed to last through childhood and into early adulthood. However, the exact duration of this immunity can vary. Some research suggests that booster doses may be beneficial in maintaining immunity, especially in populations at higher risk for HIB diseases, such as individuals with sickle cell disease or those who have undergone a bone marrow transplant.

The CDC and other health organizations continuously review data to optimize vaccination schedules and ensure prolonged protection against HIB bacteria. The HIB vaccine offers robust and enduring protection against various serious infections, vital in safeguarding children's health during their most vulnerable years.

Who Should Get the HIB Vaccine

The HIB vaccine is primarily recommended for young children at risk for HIB infections. Here are the specific groups and demographics for whom the vaccine is typically advised:

  • Infants and Young Children: The standard immunization schedule recommends that children receive the HIB vaccine starting at two months, with additional doses at four months, six months, and a final booster dose between 12 and 15 months.
  • Children with Certain Medical Conditions: Children with specific medical conditions like sickle cell disease, asplenia (absence of a spleen), or those who have undergone a bone marrow transplant are at an increased risk for HIB disease. 
  • Unvaccinated Older Children and Adults: While most older children and adults do not typically require the HIB vaccine, it may be recommended for those who did not receive it during childhood and have certain medical conditions, like HIV infection or functional asplenia.
  • Catch-up Vaccinations: Children who have missed their HIB vaccine doses are advised to undergo catch-up vaccinations to ensure they are adequately protected.

It's important to consult with a healthcare provider or your child's doctor to determine the most appropriate vaccination schedule, especially if there are underlying health conditions or if the child has missed initial doses.

Who Should Not Get the HIB Vaccine

While the HIB vaccine is safe and effective for most individuals, there are certain contraindications where vaccination should be avoided or approached cautiously. These include:

  • Severe Allergic Reactions: Individuals who have had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose of the HIB vaccine or any vaccine component should not receive further doses.
  • Illness: Those with a moderate or severe illness, with or without a fever, are usually advised to wait until recovery before getting the HIB vaccine. 
  • Age Considerations: The HIB vaccine is not typically recommended for most adults since they are not at high risk for HIB infections. However, specific exceptions depend on individual health circumstances.
  • Pregnancy: While there's limited data on the use of the HIB vaccine in pregnant women, it's generally not recommended since the risk of HIB disease in adults is low.
  • Certain Medical Conditions: Individuals with certain conditions, such as a compromised immune system or those undergoing certain radiation therapy, should consult their healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of receiving the vaccine. 

Talk With A Lawyer Now

Side Effects: Understanding the Risks Associated with the HIB Vaccine

While the HIB vaccine is generally safe, it can have side effects like all vaccines. Recognizing these is crucial, especially for those considering legal counsel for vaccine-related injuries. Here are common and rare side effects associated with the HIB vaccine:

Common Side Effects:

  • Redness, Swelling, and Pain 

  • Fever

  • Irritability and Discomfort

Rare But Serious Side Effects:
  • Severe Allergic Reactions: These are extremely rare but can include difficulty breathing, wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, a fast heartbeat, or dizziness. Such reactions typically occur within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.
  • High Fever and Seizures: Though rare, high fevers leading to seizures (febrile seizures) can occur, requiring immediate medical attention.
  • Serious Joint Pain or Stiffness: Uncommon but serious, especially if persistent or severe.
  • Anaphylaxis: A severe, life-threatening allergic reaction that can include symptoms such as swelling of the face and throat, difficulty breathing, a rapid drop in blood pressure, and shock. Immediate medical attention is crucial in such cases.
  • Neurological Disorders: In very rare instances, neurological disorders, such as Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), a condition where the body's immune system attacks the nerves, may occur.
  • Persistent Crying or Screaming: Children may sometimes experience prolonged crying or high-pitched screaming, indicating distress or pain following the vaccination.
  • Hypersensitivity Reactions: Apart from anaphylaxis, other hypersensitivity reactions like skin rashes or hives might occur, indicating an allergic response to the vaccine.
  • Thrombocytopenia: This condition involves decreased platelets in the blood, potentially leading to bleeding disorders or bruising.

If you or your child experiences any severe or long-lasting side effects following a HIB vaccine, it's crucial to seek medical attention. 

Additionally, understanding your rights is important. Adverse effects from vaccines, including the HIB vaccine, can be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) and may be eligible for compensation under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP).

A specialized vaccine injury lawyer will provide the necessary guidance and representation in navigating these issues, making sure that your case is handled with the care and expertise it deserves.

Vaccine Recommendations and Safety

Ensuring the safe administration of the HIB vaccine is paramount. Here are key guidelines and safety precautions recommended for the vaccine:

  1. Standard Immunization Schedule: The HIB vaccine is typically given in four doses, at two months, four months, six months, and a final booster between 12 and 15 months.
  2. Pre-Vaccination Check: Healthcare providers should review the patient's medical history for any allergies, previous vaccine reactions, or medical conditions that might contraindicate vaccination.
  3. Post-Vaccination Observation: After receiving the HIB vaccine, a short observation period in the clinic or hospital is advised to monitor for immediate allergic reactions.
  4. Reporting Adverse Events: Any adverse reactions should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) to contribute to the ongoing safety monitoring of vaccines.
  5. Consultation for Special Cases: Individuals with certain medical conditions (like immune system problems, HIV infection, or sickle cell disease) or those undergoing treatments like chemotherapy or radiation therapy should consult their healthcare provider for personalized recommendations.
  6. Follow-Up for Side Effects: Mild side effects should be monitored, and if any severe reaction occurs, medical attention should be sought immediately.
  7. Record Keeping: Maintaining an accurate vaccination record is crucial, especially for children, to ensure they receive all recommended doses for full protection.
  8. Educating Caregivers: Parents or caregivers should be informed about the potential side effects and the importance of completing the vaccine series.

Get Help Today

Vaccine Data: Statistics and Key Figures

The HIB vaccine has played a significant role in public health, drastically reducing the incidence of HIB diseases. However, like all medical interventions, it's important to be aware of its usage, effectiveness, and the potential for adverse reactions. Here are some key statistics:

  • Dramatic Reduction in Disease Incidence: The CDC reports that since introducing the HIB vaccine, cases of invasive HIB disease in children under five have decreased by 99% in the United States.
  • High Vaccination Rates: According to the World Health Organization (WHO), global coverage with three doses of the HIB vaccine has reached approximately 72%, highlighting its widespread acceptance and use.
  • Adverse Reactions and VAERS Reports: While most HIB vaccine recipients experience no or mild side effects, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) provides a mechanism for reporting significant adverse effects. It's essential to note that the number of severe reactions reported is relatively low compared to the millions of doses administered.
  • Compensation for Vaccine Injuries: The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) covers HIB vaccines. As per VICP data, a small percentage of individuals have received compensation for injuries related to the HIB vaccine, acknowledging the rare but real risk of serious adverse reactions.

Where Can I Get My Child Vaccinated?

Ensuring your child receives the HIB vaccine is key to protecting them against serious HIB infections. Here are common and accessible places where you can get your child vaccinated:

  1. Pediatrician's Office: Your child's pediatrician or primary healthcare provider is often the first vaccination choice. They can provide a personalized vaccination schedule.
  2. Local Health Clinics: Community health clinics offer vaccinations, often at lower costs or on a sliding scale based on income.
  3. Public Health Departments: County or state health departments often provide vaccination services and can be a resource for free or low-cost vaccines.
  4. Pharmacies: Many pharmacies now offer vaccinations, including the HIB vaccine, which is especially convenient for booster doses.
  5. Schools or Community Centers: Some areas may offer vaccination programs through schools or community events, particularly during public health drives.
  6. Hospitals: In some cases, hospitals have vaccination clinics that provide routine immunizations like the HIB vaccine.
  7. Travel Clinics: If you're planning international travel, these clinics can provide necessary vaccinations for your child.

We recommend keeping your child's vaccination record to each appointment to keep it current. It's also a good idea to call ahead and confirm vaccine availability and any documentation you might need to bring. 

In the rare case of an adverse reaction, proper documentation is very important for establishing liability for a vaccine injury.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Vaccine Lawyer

I reached out to My Vaccine Lawyer after confirming I suffered from SIRVA. They were so helpful, understanding and thorough throughout the process. They were quick to respond, always answered the phone and I feel they fought to get me what I was entitled to. If you suffered from an injury then please call My Vaccine Lawyer. They will take care of you!

- Melissa Heffley, SIRVA Client

 

 

Don't worry, we're here to help.